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I Learn Library

A human library inspired by the stories in the film

Immigrant Parents

By Ruth Martinez  |   From : Los Angeles, California  |   School : Social Justice Humanitas Academy

            When I was younger I used to live with the fear that one day my parents would be deported. Everyday at school that would be the thought behind my mind and I always wondered if when I got out of school there would be no one there to pick me up. That fear caused me to be confused and it walked with me throughout my life. I remember once when I went to a food store with my mom I was around like 7 years old and the cashier only knew how to speak English and I stood their translating everything in Spanish for her.  It was obvious that my mom wasn’t from this country. Luckily my dad always had a job that paid him very well so we never had financial problems as a family. Everyday for years that was the number one thought in my head. Thinking and thinking of the day that my parents would be deported. I vividly remember the day that changed my parents lives and our families life forever. At the time I was living in some apartments in Sylmar and it was already dark outside. Before that my parents applied to be able to get their legal documents. Everyday my parents especially my mom would check the mail to see if their papers came in. That day late at night my mom checked the mail and her green card was their wrapped in an envelope. My mom was crying and so was I now that I knew that my mom wouldn’t be sent back to Mexico. However, my dad´s green card wasn’t there. My dad felt a sense of nervousness and anxiety. My dad and the whole family thought of the worst. My dad thought he was going to be deported, but luckily that wasn´t the case. The next week after my mom got her papers, in the mail was my dad’s green card. That sense of relief I had was the best feeling possible. Knowing that no one was going to be able to separate me from my parents assured me a life of love and happiness.

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